Lowering Your Property Tax

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated October 27, 2010)

Have you ever felt that you were paying too much for your property taxes? Well this may surprise you, but you aren't alone. Most homeowners feel that they are all being charged too much for their property taxes, and only wish that there was a way that they could lower them. Lowering your property taxes isn't that difficult, though it will require some work on your part. Simply follow these simple guidelines, and you will be amazed at how simple lowering your property tax really is.

  • Go to the assessor. When you get your annual tax bill, look to see if the assessor's office is listed. Usually it is, but if not you may need to do a little bit of research online, or with your phone book. If you cannot find it using those tools, then visit your local town offices. You need to hurry though, since on the average you only have 60 days to file an appeal from the time your bill was mailed. When you are there, obtain a copy of the property card for your home.
  • Inspect your property card. This card is supposed to have information about your home that is used to assess the value of your home (such as square footage, number of rooms, bathrooms, and so on). Carefully inspect your property card to ensure that there are no math errors. Property taxes are usually figured by using a percentage of the value of the home that is multiplied by a tax rate. Sometimes a simple clerical error such as a misclassification of property type, or an incorrect description of your home can dramatically affect the overall taxes you need to pay.
  • Compare the neighborhood. Get the average cost of the homes in your neighborhood by either looking online, by visiting your local town center. This information is a matter of public record and shouldn't be too difficult to locate. When you find the information, try to compare your home's value with that of other similar homes in your area. Try to get the homes that have descriptions that are as close to yours as possible. Look for any discrepancies that have a difference of five percent or more.
  • If necessary, file an appeal. Every state has its own process for filing an appeal, so be sure that you are familiar with the process for your state. On the average, you will be required to submit some kind of a written appeal that describes why the assessment is in error. Make the statement as accurate and detailed as possible. If a hearing is granted, then you will need to have plenty of evidence, so include things like any flaws your home may have (termites are a perfect example), the property card, the value of other similar homes in your neighborhood, and even photos to compare your home to similar ones in your neighborhood.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

MORE FROM LEE

Melting Cheese for Sauces

Cheese, no matter the type, can be a great ingredient when cooking. One of the most useful ways that you can utilize cheese ...

Discover More

How to Budget Holiday Gift Spending

Trying to live within a budget is hard a hard lesson for many people, how to budget holiday gift spending is one that is even ...

Discover More

Cleaning Stained Hearths

Whenever the weather begins to get a little colder, or you are looking for a romantic evening, thoughts naturally begin to ...

Discover More

MAX Power! A powerful lithium-ion drill/driver that delivers 0-to-650 RPM and 115 inches-per-pound of torque in a lightweight, easy-to-use package. An anti-slip soft grip and LED worklight makes this tool a delight to use. Check out Black & Decker 20-Volt Cordless Drill/Driver today!

MORE HOME IMPROVEMENT TIPS

Getting a Home Improvement Loan

One of the most mind racking parts of any home improvement project is how are you going to pay for it. Before making any ...

Discover More

Getting Home Insurance

Home insurance, unlike car insurance, is not legally necessary if you own your home outright. However, just because it is not ...

Discover More

Home Improvement Financing

The largest stumbling block that many people face with home improvement projects is the financing. There are more options for ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Receive an e-mail several times each week with a featured home improvement tip. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Receive an e-mail several times each week with a featured home improvement tip. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

Links and Sharing
Share