Choosing an Energy Efficient Storm Door

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated July 20, 2016)

When most people look to make their homes more energy efficient, they rarely stop to think of the storm doors that they are using. The reason for this is that it's a storm door, and rarely does that ever really make anyone think of energy savings. The simple fact of the matter is that choosing an energy efficient storm door can very easily add a measurable amount of savings to your home energy bill.

  • Understand the basics. Energy efficient storm doors should have the same general makeup as energy efficient windows. Since storm doors are quite often nothing but door shaped windows which are designed to help protect your regular door, you should kind of look at them like windows. For example, all your energy efficient windows should be double paned, and so too should your storm door.
  • Is it Energy Star qualified? A fairly simple thing to check when looking for an energy efficient storm door is to see if it is Energy Star qualified. If it is Energy Star qualified, that means that it is considered energy efficient, and will meet the standards set by the federal government. Often times you are eligible for a tax credit if the storm door is actually Energy Star qualified.
  • Look for NFRC Certification. Another certification that you should keep an eye out for is one offered by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC). This certification will tell you that the door will help save energy costs and thus also helping to protect the environment by promoting energy efficiency.
  • What is the R-Value? One of the most important things that you need to look for in a storm door, as with any other kind of door or window, is what the R-value of the door is. Typically when looking at the R-value you will want to have the highest possible number. R-value is how heat resistance is measured, and is also often used in insulation as well.

Once you have these basic guidelines firmly in hand, you will be able to begin choosing energy efficient storm doors that will actually work for your particular area. After all, just because a storm door maybe energy efficient in one area of the country, there is no guarantee that it will be just as effective or efficient in other parts of the country. Just be sure that you take your time and choose the best possible door.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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