Priming and Painting Trim

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated July 14, 2014)

For some reason, priming and painting trim is a project that no one really pays attention to, until it is pointed out specifically. It is amazing how properly priming, and painting, the trim areas of your home can have a dramatic effect on the overall look of your home. In large part this is because most people do not notice just how much the trim makes the rest of the home stand out. Trim is supposed to be an accent area of your home, which will enhance its overall look. When this area doesn't look that great, it can make the rest of your home look bad as well. Here is how you can both prime and paint the trim of your home, and make it look fantastic again.

Materials needed:

  • Exterior trim paint (in your chosen color)
  • Primer for your specific surface (Wood, masonry, stone, etc.)
  • Painters tape
  • 4 inch paint brush
  • 2 inch tapered sash paint brush
  • Corner roller

Soffits:

  1. Focus on the fascia. When painting trim, it is always best to start high and work your way down. This is done so that the paint will not drip down into areas that you have already finished, and ruin your work. Start by working with the fascia first (the surface above the soffits), and then work your way down. Just as when you paint anything else, be sure that you apply your primer first before you begin painting.
  2. Paint the soffits. On your soffits, start from the back of the wall and work your way forward. As you do this focus on the panels and trim before you begin working on the molding below the soffit itself.
  3. Don't forget the moldings. Be sure that once you have finished priming the panels, that you don't forget the moldings.
  4. Paint it. Once you have finished priming everything, go ahead and begin to paint it. Follow the same pattern that you used when priming. This will help to ensure that you don't need miss anything, and that you limit your mistakes. If you need to do more than one coat of paint, make sure that you allow everything to dry completely before you begin your subsequent coats.

Jambs, casing, and other trim:

  1. Apply some painters tape. Before you begin priming or painting the trim, make sure that you apply some painters tape near the edges. This will help prevent any mistakes from going onto the siding, floors, or even the glass of windows. Have the tape go out at least two or three inches from the trim to ensure you provide ample protection.
  2. Prime the casing, trim, and jambs. Once again, start at the top and work your way down. In this case though, make sure that you start on the inside areas of the window or door jamb, before you work towards the outside.
  3. Paint, starting with the jambs. After you have primed your jambs, casings, and other trim allow everything to dry completely. When everything is dry, begin painting, starting at the top inside corner of your window and door jambs. If you need to paint any casings, make sure that you do it while the jambs are still wet. This will help reduce any potential mistakes.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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