Replacing Sheet Paneling

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated January 24, 2020)

One of the more common wall covering options has long been sheet paneling. This great option gives you the look of wooden walls at a fraction of the cost. Best of all, there are some other issues that help make sheet paneling an attractive choice for homeowners and do-it-yourself enthusiasts. Some of these include the durability of the paneling, the relatively easy installation process, and even the ability to replace damaged sections easily as well. If you find yourself in need of replacing sheet paneling in your home, simply follow these steps, and you will quickly have a new wall.

  1. Remove the trim. Being as careful as you possibly can, remove the baseboard and top molding of the paneling. The best way that you can do this is by using a wallboard or putty knife to create a small opening, and then inserting a small pry bar into the gap. Gently remove the nails and the trim.
  2. Remove the paneling, Take a framing square or straight edge, and draw a line on the panel that is about three to four inches from the damaged section (on either side if applicable). With the line in place, have a friend hold the straight edge or framing square along the line. Use a linoleum knife and begin cutting along the line. Be sure that you use a decent amount of pressure, but not too much since you don't want to damage the wall underneath the paneling. If done properly, you should be able to cut through the paneling in two or three passes. Begin removing the paneling by peeling it off. Considering how much glue was used, you may end up breaking off the paneling in chunks or sections, and you may need to use a hammer and chisel to remove some o it. As you do though, be careful not to damage the wall underneath. Use a paint scraper to remove any old adhesive that is still remaining on the wall. Inspect (if possible) the vapor barrier of the wall, and repair it if necessary.
  3. Match the paneling. Once you have remove the paneling, take a decent sized section to your local home improvement store. Use the section to help you find a match to the paneling that you have in your home. It should be as close to color, texture, and so on as possible.
  4. Cut and prep. With your new paneling in hand, cut and prepare it to fit into missing section on the wall. Once you have the paneling cut to size, begin placing adhesive onto the back of it. Typically, you do this by applying zigzagging beads of the glue from top to bottom, every 16 inches, and about two inches away from the edges.
  5. Place paneling, and replace trim. With the help of a friend, place the paneling onto the wall. Be sure that the seams line up on both sides as you do this. Have your friend hold the paneling in place while you nail the paneling to the wall. Once you have the paneling in place, begin replacing the trim that you had removed earlier. If you would like, you can wait for a day or tow prior to replacing the trim to allow the adhesive to completely dry. After the trim is back in place, you may want to fill any nail holes with wood filler.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

MORE FROM LEE

Buying Cars Wholesale

Buying wholesale is a one of the best ways to get a great deal on purchasing a vehicle. Here is the way that you can get ...

Discover More

Replace Brake Drums

While it might be intimidating to replace brake drums, it does not mean that the average person can't do it. Instead of ...

Discover More

Maintaining Melons

Whether it is a watermelon, cantaloupe, muskmelon, or one of the many other kinds of melons available, this fruit can be ...

Discover More

Find the Right Tool Right Away Finally, a homeowner's set that includes all the tools needed to complete basic DIY projects at an affordable price! The tools are stored in a molded case for security and portability. Check out Stanley 65-Piece Homeowner's Tool Kit today!

More Home Improvement Tips

Repairing Water Damaged Walls

Water damaged walls can be an unsightly mess that can be pretty costly to repair. That is, unless you do the work ...

Discover More

Patching Cracks in a Wall

Homes and business suffer plenty of wear and tear. Leaning to fix cracks in the walls of your home or business can help ...

Discover More

Repairing Cracked Plaster

It is a sad fact of life that plaster walls will become cracked, or have some fairly nasty holes after a while. Repairing ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Receive an e-mail several times each week with a featured home improvement tip. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 4 + 1?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Receive an e-mail several times each week with a featured home improvement tip. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)